Berta Cáceres’ Daughter Escapes Machete Attack in Honduras

The Guardian reports that Bertha Zuñiga, daughter of the murdered Honduran environmentalist Berta Cáceres, has survived an armed attack. Zuñiga, 26, was attacked along with two other members of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organisations of Honduras (COPINH) as they drove back from a community visit in central Honduras on Friday. Zuñiga was recently named leader of COPINH.

“Three assailants tried to attack the COPINH members with machetes after a black pickup truck forced them to stop by blocking the road. They managed to escape, but came under renewed attack as the driver of the pickup tried to force their vehicle off the cliff-edge road,” The Guardian reports.

Democracy Now!’s Amy Goodman interviewed Zuñiga about the incident:

On Friday, June 30th, when we were returning from a community where COPINH has continually worked, we suffered an attack on our way back. And we were traveling in a vehicle that belonged to COPINH, and it’s a vehicle that is recognized as belonging to COPINH. And we believe that the attack had to do with a conflict over water and water sources in the region. In that conflict, we also know that USAID has played a role.

So, we didn’t expect the attack. We were traveling back from the community, when a vehicle passed us at high speed and blocked the road in front of us. And men jumped out with machetes and also threw rocks at us, trying to attack us. And then, as we escaped, they pursued us.

Listen to the complete interview here:

See our extensive coverage on Berta Cáceres’ assassination and follow up reporting here.

print